Patrick: A Prophet for Global Justice

On St Patrick’s Day, let’s acknowledge him as an activist, who reportedly spoke out against slavery and oppression and other injustices.

The following was first published at DailyTheology.com:

 

Daily Theology

stpatrick St. Patrick window at St. Benin’s Church, Ireland.

In search of St. Patrick
St. Patrick is one of a handful of Christian saints, along with Mary, Valentine and Francis, that is celebrated in popular culture. His feast day is commemorated with supermarket meat sales, green rivers, green beer, and (my favorite) paradesBut who was the real St. Patrick?

Most people know that the missionary Patrick (Patricius or Pádraig) helped to bring Christianity to Ireland in the 5th Century. Some may remember how his first visit to the island was as a slave. Sadly, only a few may remember Patrick’s opposition to structural injustice and his prophetic defense of victims of violence and human trafficking. As with so many of our saints, Patrick’s radical application of the Gospel has been domesticated and stripped of its challenging message. Rather than witnessing to the prophetic and loving call of the…

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#NeverAgain has already affected the debate. Last week, Oregon lawmakers tightened up some gun restrictions, while Florida lawmakers are hammering out a deal to impose a higher age limit and a longer waiting period for purchasing semiautomatic rifles like the one used at Stoneman Douglas.

Just as notably, public outrage is prompting a smattering of corporations to rethink their ties to the NRA.” – Michelle Cottle, The Atlantic

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#WeStandWithAmericanKids 
#Resilience101  #GunReformWorks  #NoGunsInSchool  #GunReformNow

 

‘I Just Want It to Be How It Was.’ Florida Shooting Survivors Describe Their First Day Back at School, by Melissa Chan, TIME (US Crime).

comfort dogs on first day back

This profile pic image was created to support the students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, and those who work beside them, as they fight for gun reform.

The design is inspired by combination of colors and stripes in both the USA and United Kingdom flags to symbolize solidarity with American people.

Original design; open source.  Free to download, use, copy and distribute with the hashtags: #WeStandWithAmericanKids #Resilience101 #GunReformWorks
#NoGunsInSchool #GunReformNow 

Profile pic stripes (1)

Featured post

This profile pic image was created to support the students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, and those who work beside them, as they fight for gun reform.

The design is inspired by the design of Japan’s flag, using red, white and blue colors to symbolize solidarity with American people.

Original design; open source.  Free to download, use, copy and distribute with the hashtags: #WeStandWithAmericanKids #Resilience101 #GunReformWorks
#NoGunsInSchool #GunReformNow 

Profile pic circle (1).jpg

Featured post

This profile pic image was created to support the students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, and those who work beside them, as they fight for gun reform.

The design is inspired by the Australian southern cross, using 5-point stars to symbolize solidarity with American people.

Original design; open source.  Free to download, use, copy and distribute with the hashtags: #WeStandWithAmericanKids #Resilience101 #GunReformWorks
#NoGunsInSchool #GunReformNow 

profile pic stars (1)

Featured post
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Sourced via Twitter:  @amydbarnett
Featured post

An Oppressor in Activist Clothing

by Dr Kerri O’Donnell.

My young adult daughter stumbled upon a Facebook post by a ‘Mommy’ who professes to be an Activist.  The woman describes herself on her official public figure Facebook page as: “I make videos. I rant. I speak places. I love my 10 kids and my hubby. I do it all because of Jesus. I am The Activist Mommy.”

My daughter was incensed by the particular post she found because it presented so many Alternate Facts, all in the name of Activism.  Alternate Facts which defied dictionary definitions, let alone freely accessible statistics.  A less generous person would say they are lies, but let’s give her the benefit of the doubt and call it ignorance. Continue reading “An Oppressor in Activist Clothing”

Readers, writers and industry professionals unite to fund cancer treatment.

Kerri O'Donnell

Everyone loves when rock-stars donate their time and skills to help people out, right?

Best-selling author (and generous mentor), Mark Dawson, is one such rock-star, donating all proceeds from his current novella to fund his friend’s breast cancer treatment.

All his professional team (editors, designers, formatters, etc) worked on it for free. Writers and readers around the world are also uniting to spread the word – and I’m proud to be part of such a group.

PLEASE SHARE.  #fightforphoenix 

And if you’d like a copy, click below. My Kindle pre-order was just $2.39 AUD.

Emma has been battling with cancer for five years, and funds raised will provide access to an experimental drug that is showing great promise.

More information about Emma and the novella project is at http://www.fightforphoenix.com.  

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You Wouldn’t Know by Looking at Me

It takes a lot of courage and patience to articulate truth when wider society is so adept at, and chronically intent upon, “criticizing, finding fault as if there were a reward for it” (Zig Ziglar).

Robin was invited to share the following work with Resilience 101 because it is an eloquent and deeply personal expression of the impacts we have on one another when we make assumptions, and form judgments, that are based on zero facts. Continue reading “You Wouldn’t Know by Looking at Me”

What should I learn about Racism?

This is one of my current projects, which I’m hosting on my personal site.  Please participate, if you wish, by including your comments at the end of the original post. Thank you.

Kerri O'Donnell

I am writing a book about racism.

‘Why?’ you might ask.

Well, not because I have any expertise on the matter.  Not because I want to.  Not because it’s easy.  Not because it’s comfortable…  It’s none of those things.  And there are a bazillion easier ways to get a cookie, so it’s not that either.

To be clear up front, I am a a middle-aged 9th+ generation Tasmanian beige-skinned woman who grew up not even knowing there was such a thing as race.  I have not personally suffered anything on the basis of my race.  Ever.

But racism is my problem anyway.

3It is my students’ problem, my friends’ problem, my relatives’ problem, my country’s problem, my online community’s problem; and, thanks to various political influences, it is likely to get poked with a stick more and more often.  I am part of all those mini-worlds, and the greater world around them…

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