Little Bit

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Patrick: A Prophet for Global Justice

On St Patrick’s Day, let’s acknowledge him as an activist, who reportedly spoke out against slavery and oppression and other injustices.

The following was first published at DailyTheology.com:

 

Daily Theology

stpatrick St. Patrick window at St. Benin’s Church, Ireland.

In search of St. Patrick
St. Patrick is one of a handful of Christian saints, along with Mary, Valentine and Francis, that is celebrated in popular culture. His feast day is commemorated with supermarket meat sales, green rivers, green beer, and (my favorite) paradesBut who was the real St. Patrick?

Most people know that the missionary Patrick (Patricius or Pádraig) helped to bring Christianity to Ireland in the 5th Century. Some may remember how his first visit to the island was as a slave. Sadly, only a few may remember Patrick’s opposition to structural injustice and his prophetic defense of victims of violence and human trafficking. As with so many of our saints, Patrick’s radical application of the Gospel has been domesticated and stripped of its challenging message. Rather than witnessing to the prophetic and loving call of the…

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You Wouldn’t Know by Looking at Me

It takes a lot of courage and patience to articulate truth when wider society is so adept at, and chronically intent upon, “criticizing, finding fault as if there were a reward for it” (Zig Ziglar).

Robin was invited to share the following work with Resilience 101 because it is an eloquent and deeply personal expression of the impacts we have on one another when we make assumptions, and form judgments, that are based on zero facts. Continue reading “You Wouldn’t Know by Looking at Me”

What should I learn about Racism?

This is one of my current projects, which I’m hosting on my personal site.  Please participate, if you wish, by including your comments at the end of the original post. Thank you.

Kerri O'Donnell

I am writing a book about racism.

‘Why?’ you might ask.

Well, not because I have any expertise on the matter.  Not because I want to.  Not because it’s easy.  Not because it’s comfortable…  It’s none of those things.  And there are a bazillion easier ways to get a cookie, so it’s not that either.

To be clear up front, I am a a middle-aged 9th+ generation Tasmanian beige-skinned woman who grew up not even knowing there was such a thing as race.  I have not personally suffered anything on the basis of my race.  Ever.

But racism is my problem anyway.

3It is my students’ problem, my friends’ problem, my relatives’ problem, my country’s problem, my online community’s problem; and, thanks to various political influences, it is likely to get poked with a stick more and more often.  I am part of all those mini-worlds, and the greater world around them…

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